Is being an older mum a new trend?

I didn’t realise I was an “older mum” until someone pointed it out to me during a radio interview recently. They commented, “You had your first child over the age of 35, how do you feel being part of the older mum generation? Did you experience any problems?” Ouch. There is it.

It’s an interesting topic. So, when is the right time to start a family? When you’re financially secure? Firmly on the property ladder? Established in a good career? Or is it as clear cut as just being emotionally ready? For me, it was the later.

People say 40 is the new 30 when it comes to motherhood. I wasn’t ready to start a family when I turned 30. I was working hard in London and my social life was great. My career was going well, I was loving life as a care-free 30-something. Having a baby wasn’t on my radar.  Five years later, I was married, content and ready. Luckily, I fell pregnant quickly and became a mum for the first time three months before my 36th birthday. I didn’t consider this as being “old”. A few close friends entered motherhood in their late twenties/ early thirties but most were the same age as me or older. It feels strange knowing we’re now all categorised as “older mums.”

During the radio interview for BBC WM I was told stats show in the last few years more babies have been born to women aged 35 and over, than to those under 25 for the first time ever.  So why are women waiting longer to start a family? I agree careers and lifestyles play a part – I’m proud of my career and having the opportunities to travel widely with work, as well as for fun. However, I also believe their is no social stigma of being childless in your thirties. Unlike when my mum was in her 30s. Times have changes. Women’s attitudes have changed.

I recently wrote an article for the Telegraph about an inspirational women who had her first child at 46. It’s empowering. I’m really pleased Debbie was happy to share her story with me. Read what is like to have your first baby at 46 here.

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Did you have a child later in life? Would you recommend it? 


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